GOOD FOR YOU || THE GARAGE

GOOD FOR YOU 

A solo exhibition about symbiotic relationships in the natural world.

Pen and Marker on Paper

by Sarah Nelson 

2019

symbiotic adjective

sym·bi·ot·ic | \ ˌsim-bē-ˈä-tik

: relating to or marked by symbiosis:

a : characterized by, living in, or being a close physical association (as in mutualism or commensalism) between two or more dissimilar organisms

b : characterized by or being a close, cooperative, or interdependent relationship

  • Miriam Webster

Good For You is a body of work highlighting the unexpected symbiotic relationships found in nature.

As an artist, I am continually drawn to the mysterious aspects of our natural world. 

I seek to understand our natural environments better, and to share these beautiful realities with others. 

It seems that there are infinite lessons to be learned from the way that chemicals, bacteria, species, and ecosystems, interact. 

In an era that feels tumultuous and fractured, I have found comfort in the natural and beneficial relationships between species in all types of environments. It seems that if these species can empower one another, we as humans should learn to peacefully engage with one another as well.  

All three types of symbiosis (mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism) can be found in human relationships, and in our relationship with nature. 

This show focuses on mutualism, where both entities are benefiting equally. 

I have fused two personal artistic styles, allowing familiar creatures to be seen in a new way. 

I seek to demonstrate the seen and unseen efforts and benefits that come from working interdependently with the planet and one another.  

My hope is that humanity will learn to be in a symbiotic relationship with our planet. Learning more about our natural world allows us to know and love the incredible earth we have more deeply, and care for it more fully.

There are three different types of symbiotic relationships: 

Mutualism: both species benefit equally

Commensalism: one benefits more than the other but no harm is done

Parasitism: one gains while the other suffers.